PPC Landing Pages: 3 Examples To Avoid Wrong Assumptions

Landing pages are designed to attract potential customers and draw them in. You want your pages to speak to your target customer-base and give them a reason to be interested in what you have to sell. You also want to make sure that these pages are attracting the right kinds of readers: namely, the ones who are most likely to buy your goods or services.

To do this effectively, it is necessary to make some broad assumptions about your readers. However, you need to be careful not to alienate potential clients by assuming too much in the process.

Example: Residential Roofing Company

If you own a business such as a residential roofing company, you can make broad assumptions about your potential clients such as:

  • They own their homes
  • They have a problem of some sort with their roof
  • They want to go with a roofing company that provides quality service at a competitive rate

So by saying things like, “As a homeowner, you know the importance of having quality work done by a trusted contractor” or “Whatever type of roofing problem you are experiencing, we are here to help,” you will be speaking directly to your intended audience.

However, you do not want to assume too much as that can make readers turn away.

For example, while your company may specialize in hail-damage repair, you do not want to make that the full focus of your landing page as someone who is looking for a roof replacement or routine maintenance may think that your company caters only to those with damages covered by insurance and turn elsewhere.

Likewise, you don’t want to advertise financing plans by saying something like, “We know that the cost of a roof repair is hard on your budget so we offer financing plans.” Someone who has sufficient funds to pay for such a job might find that off-putting and move on.  Instead, you can say, “Many people find roof repairs difficult to afford, so we offer convenient financing plans.” That way, you will not risk insulting your more well-to-do readers.

Example: Bankruptcy Attorney

If your business is a law firm focusing on bankruptcy cases, you can assume that those who would seek your services have the following characteristics:

  • They are in financial trouble
  • They have bill collectors contacting them frequently
  • They are unsure how to get out of their financial mess

So if your landing page includes lines such as “Filing for bankruptcy can end the constant harassment from bill-collectors and help you get on the right track to financial health and well-being” or “We have helped hundreds of people climb out of a the downward spiral of debt, and we can help you too,” you will be talking directly to the people who are most in need of your services.

Again, however, you should be careful not to assume too much. For example, saying something like “Medical bills and unemployment are out of your control. Your debt problems are not your fault” can alienate potential clients because many may be in debt as a result of living beyond their means for too long. Phrasing like this may lead these particular readers to feel shame for the debt and they may believe that you are interested only in helping those who are in debt through no fault of their own. Worse, they might feel that you would look down on them for their bad decisions and therefore search elsewhere.

Rather than making an assumption about how the readers got into their situations, you can simply list different ways that people fall into the position where they might consider bankruptcy. And, of course, be sure not to come off as judgmental.

Example: Life Insurance Broker

If you are in the business of selling life insurance policies, there are basic assumptions you can make about the people who find their way to your landing page.

  • They are interested in learning more about the benefits of life insurance
  • They want to know about the different types of life insurance
  • They want a general idea about how much a life insurance policy will cost them

So you may want to include lines such as, “If you are considering life insurance for the first time, you should be aware of the pros and cons of permanent versus term policies” or “Your life insurance costs will depend on a number of factors including…” on your landing pages. This will give your readers the impression that the article is made specifically to inform them of their options.

On the other hand, if you make assumptions that are too specific and say something such as, “Life insurance will help your children by providing funds that can cover their college tuition” you may alienate those who don’t have kids and don’t plan to. These readers may feel that life insurance is something that does not pertain to them. Instead, you can refer to “the loved ones you leave behind” or, in the case of whole life, you can focus on the way that the policy can be used as an investment vehicle.

Let Your Landing Pages Work for You

Your landing page should be designed in such a way that it draws in potential clients and keeps them on your page. Make sure that your visitors are made to feel that they are exactly the type of client you cater to so that they will be more likely to contact you for more information.  And, of course, do not alienate a perfect prospect by assuming too much. Remember, a well-written landing page can do wonders for improving our conversio